Monday, November 17, 2014

On Sale Now: COMMANDO Operation Dervish (Book 4)

http://amzn.com/B00PPMN9EW
Click the Cover to Visit on Amazon
North Africa, November 1941. Days before the British launch Operation Crusader, Corporal Lynch and the other Commandos are given the task of accompanying a makeshift strike force of British tanks and armoured cars deep into the Libyan Desert.
Their mission: carry out a series of lightning-fast raids against Axis bases, creating a diversion to confuse the enemy commanders in the critical hours before the British Eighth Army pours over the border into Libya.

Meanwhile, Afrika Korps Captain Karl Steiner guides a squadron of German panzers into the deep desert in order to provide warning against any British advances. The two forces, German and British, are on a collision course than can only end in blood and flames, littering the desert sands with slaughtered men and shattered tanks.


Operation Dervish is the fourth book in a series of military action - adventure novels written in the spirit of classic war movies and wartime adventure pulp fiction. 

I managed to get the ebook version of Operation Dervish out a little earlier than expected. I hope to have the trade paperback version out the first week of December at the latest. This book was a ton of fun to research and write, and features, if I may say so myself, some kick-ass action scenes. The big challenge of writing a series like this is keeping the stories fresh, and I think Operation Dervish pulls that off quite handily.

9 comments:

Charles Gramlich said...

Great cover!

Justin Aucoin said...

Hooray!

Anonymous said...

Looks good!
Jim Cornelius
www.frontierpartisans.com

FreeLiverFree said...

Just posting here to say I read Killer Instincts and really enjoyed it!

Jack Badelaire said...

Thanks for dropping by and letting me know you enjoyed KILLER INSTINCTS. For a first novel, it seems to hold up pretty well according to most folks. :)

FreeLiverFree said...

I enjoyed it a lot. While the book was compared to the Matt Helm series and I can certainly see why, but it reminded me of the first few issues of Mike Grell's comic Jon Sable, Freelance. The first two issues had him doing jobs as a mercenary while the next story arc told how a quest for revenge lead him into mercenary work. Don't worry though, your character and story are different enough from the comic. William is much more of an everyman than Sable who was an Olympic athlete and Safari guide before his family was murdered by poachers (and then he got sucked into the Rhodesian Bush War.) Despite coming from a wealthy family, William could be any normal young man. He didn't even have a military background like some of these characters.

I also liked how you dealt with Richard (Camellion, the Death Merchant.) The two Death Merchant books I read were awful. (One in a so bad it's good way. The other just awful.) In your book, Richard comes about as a sinister figure whose motives are ambiguous. That said he still seems more human than in the original series. I don't think Rosenberger ever realized he was writing about what was essentially a sociopath.

Jack Badelaire said...

FLF, thanks for all the comments. As to Richard, he is my tribute to Rosenberger's creation, and I tried to write him as how I'd picture RC after a few decades of low-to-no actual "field work", having many years to reflect back on his life, and whether he'd be more or less crazy. But yeah, in the hands of JR, the Death Merchant was an absolute nutjob, the complete antithesis of "Dark Knights" like Mack Bolan.

FreeLiverFree said...

Your use of Richard reminded me of certain comics were a seemingly silly superhero or villain is reinvented as a rather cool character. Of course, in comics you are more likely to see the reverse a classic character is suddenly portrayed as a sociopath or incompetent or something.

FreeLiverFree said...

Just here to tell you, I downloaded a copy of San Francisco Slaughter.